In Honor of Crabby Teenage Daughters

I’m slightly addicted to my site stats.  For those of you who don’t write a blog or maintain a website or seek personal validation from numerical analysis, site stats are a break down of how many people visit your site and where they’re coming from.  For example, yesterday someone (I don’t know who, but suspect it could be anyone of a few million parents) googled the phrase crabby teenage daughters and found my site.  If you google said phrase, my blog comes up on the first page, fourth entry.  Pretty sweet for me.  Hopefully it was helpful for the reader.

This got me thinking.  Izzy was quite crabby yesterday when I picked her up from school.  I suspect it’s because she spent the school day carrying a 60 lb backpack back and forth between two campuses and up and down stairs in 90 degree heat with a very sore knee.  But she said it was because I was naggy and mean and anyway she wasn’t crabby.  I responded to that by reminding her that I drove all the way to the Valley to pick her up from school and brought food and an ice-cold drink for her.  I then found myself querying as to why she was so cranky and ungrateful.

What’s surprising is that we didn’t get into a major fight after this exchange.  There was no skirmish at all.  I just drove a little faster so I could drop her off at home sooner and she turned up the radio creating a brick wall of sound that made further conversation impossible.  God Bless K-Rock.

So I dedicate this post to my formerly crabby teenage daughter for encouraging my  practice of detachment, patience and humor.  Actually, I think I’ve hit upon something–detachment, patience and humor may be the triumvirate of mindful, sane parenting.  I feel a book deal coming my way…

6 thoughts on “In Honor of Crabby Teenage Daughters

  1. Deborah-
    If it’s feasible in Izzy’s situation, see if you can get copies of her textbooks through online book resellers. It’s madness to expect kids to destroy their backs carrying these heavy texts around. I did this for my kids, and it was a life saver for the whole family (for reasons that can be inferred from your post). They could keep the school issued copies in their lockers at school, and leave their extra copies at home for doing homework and studying. I still have many of these books at home. I doubt whether Izzy is using the same books, but you never know. You would be welcome to have our old books. I learned about this trick from the parents of an older child who graciously handed down some of their daughter’s old ‘”extras” to us.

  2. Pingback: In Honor of Crabby Mothers | betweenpages.org

  3. Pingback: Ode to Crabby Teenagers | betweenpages.org

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